Ruth Lesson Six

Naomi’s Plan – Ruth 3:1-18

Ruth’s mother-in-law Naomi said to her, “My daughter, shouldn’t I find security for you, so that you will be taken care of? Now isn’t Boaz our relative? Haven’t you been working with his female servants? This evening he will be winnowing barley on the threshing floor. Wash, put on perfumed oil, and wear your best clothes. Go down to the threshing floor, but don’t let the man know you are there until he has finished eating and drinking. When he lies down, notice the place where he’s lying, go in and uncover his feet, and lie down. Then he will explain to you what you should do.”

So Ruth said to her, “I will do everything you say.” She went down to the threshing floor and did everything her mother-in-law had instructed her. After Boaz ate, drank, and was in good spirits, he went to lie down at the end of the pile of barley. Then she went in secretly, uncovered his feet, and lay down.

At midnight, Boaz was startled, turned over, and there lying at his feet was a woman! So he asked, “Who are you?”

“I am Ruth, your slave,” she replied. “Spread your cloak over me, for you are a family redeemer.”

10 Then he said, “May the Lord bless you, my daughter. You have shown more kindness now than before, because you have not pursued younger men, whether rich or poor. 11 Now don’t be afraid, my daughter. I will do for you whatever you say,  since all the people in my town know that you are a woman of noble character.  12 Yes, it is true that I am a family redeemer, but there is a redeemer closer than I am. 13 Stay here tonight, and in the morning, if he wants to redeem you, that’s good. Let him redeem you. But if he doesn’t want to redeem you, as the Lord lives, I will. Now lie down until morning.”

14 So she lay down at his feet until morning but got up while it was still dark. Then Boaz said, “Don’t let it be known that a woman came to the threshing floor.” 15 And he told Ruth, “Bring the shawl you’re wearing and hold it out.” When she held it out, he shoveled six measures of barley into her shawl, and she went into the town.

16 She went to her mother-in-law, Naomi, who asked her, “How did it go, my daughter?”

Then Ruth told her everything the man had done for her. 17 She said, “He gave me these six measures of barley, because he said, ‘Don’t go back to your mother-in-law empty-handed.’ ”

18 Naomi said, “My daughter, wait until you find out how things go, for he won’t rest unless he resolves this today.” (HCSB)

There are three sections to this passage.

  • Verses 1-5: Naomi’s plan.
  • Verses 6-15: The execution of the plan.
  • Verses 16-18: The results of the plan.

Naomi’s Plan

Ruth’s mother-in-law Naomi said to her, “My daughter, shouldn’t I find security for you, so that you will be taken care of? Now isn’t Boaz our relative? Haven’t you been working with his female servants? This evening he will be winnowing barley on the threshing floor. Wash, put on perfumed oil, and wear your best clothes. Go down to the threshing floor, but don’t let the man know you are there until he has finished eating and drinking. When he lies down, notice the place where he’s lying, go in and uncover his feet, and lie down. Then he will explain to you what you should do.”

So Ruth said to her, “I will do everything you say.”

Although not explicit in the conclusion of chapter two, it is safe to infer that Naomi expected Boaz to pursue Ruth in a manner that was more than a landowner being kind to a foreigner. Naomi was expecting Boaz to pursue Ruth in a way that would lead to marriage and a secure future for both her and Ruth. For whatever reason, Boaz does not follow that path, and Naomi decides to take matters into her own hand.

Verse 1

Naomi’s question to Ruth contains two parts.

  • Shouldn’t Naomi do something to find security for Ruth?
  • Shouldn’t Naomi do something so that Ruth will be taken care of and not have to worry about her future?

From a historical contextual standpoint, this was a critically important point. Women in Israel longed for the security and tranquility in the home of a loving husband. Naomi’s single reason for doing this is the welfare of her daughter-in-law. Also, it was the duty of the mother-in-law to see to the security and welfare of the widowed daughter-in-law. In this case, there is added weight as Ruth has pledged her life to Naomi until death separates them. These two women display a covenant relationship with each other where they place the other’s welfare above their own.

Verse 2

Typically, barley was threshed after the wheat was harvested, usually late May to June. The best threshing floors were rock outcroppings on hilltops. This would take advantage of the open area and wind to separate the grain from the chaff. It is also likely that the threshing floor in question here was at least on the outskirts of town, if not farther away. The rationale for doing it at night would be gentler breezes.

Verse 3-5

Although on the surface, it appears simple enough, a lot going on in the first sentence of verse three.

  • Wash – This was a typical first step in preparing for a sexual encounter or marriage.
  • Put on perfumed oil – The Hebrew verb means to anoint and likely refers to perfumed olive oil. Due to the hot climate and lack of modern deodorants, this was necessary to combat body odors.
  • Wear your best clothes – This is likely not a correct translation of the Hebrew word. Likely, Ruth was still wearing some type of clothing to indicate mourning, and changing clothes would imply a shift from mourning to everyday life.

Another reason for Boaz, or anyone, to be there at night was to act as security to ensure the grain wasn’t stolen.

Ruth wasn’t to let Boaz know she was there until he had finished eating and drinking. There is no indication that Boaz was drunk, either implicitly or explicitly. In addition, the idea of Boaz being drunk would conflict with the characteristics describing Boaz earlier in the book.

The situation gets even more complicated when Naomi tells Ruth to uncover his feet/legs and lie down with him. Understanding the cultural norms at that time make it even murkier.

  • At winnowing time, the threshing floors often became a place of illicit sex.
  • Since men often spent the night in the fields next to the collected grain, prostitutes would often visit them to offer their services.

Although Ruth’s actions could be interpreted as seductive, her actions so far and through this encounter suggest that was not the intent. Ruth is anything but a typical Moabite. Instead, Ruth possesses the characteristics of Israelite hesed, steadfast love, kindness, faithfulness, and loyalty within a relationship.

This is confirmed by Boaz’s words to her in verses 10 and 11.

  • May the Lord bless you.
  • You are a woman of noble character.

Boaz could interpret Ruth’s actions in one of three ways.

  • Boaz could wake up and interpret her actions as those of a prostitute and partake of the services offered.
  • Boaz could wake up and interpret her actions as those of a prostitute, but as a noble and virtuous Israelite chase her away.
  • Boaz could wake up and immediately recognize the true intentions of Ruth’s actions and respond favorably.

This is a reminder that sex is a wonderful gift from God to be enjoyed by a man and woman in a marriage relationship after the couple is married.

Verses 6-15

She went down to the threshing floor and did everything her mother-in-law had instructed her. After Boaz ate, drank, and was in good spirits, he went to lie down at the end of the pile of barley. Then she went in secretly, uncovered his feet, and lay down.

At midnight, Boaz was startled, turned over, and there lying at his feet was a woman! So he asked, “Who are you?”

“I am Ruth, your slave,” she replied. “Spread your cloak over me, for you are a family redeemer.”

10 Then he said, “May the Lord bless you, my daughter. You have shown more kindness now than before, because you have not pursued younger men, whether rich or poor. 11 Now don’t be afraid, my daughter. I will do for you whatever you say,  since all the people in my town know that you are a woman of noble character.  12 Yes, it is true that I am a family redeemer, but there is a redeemer closer than I am. 13 Stay here tonight, and in the morning, if he wants to redeem you, that’s good. Let him redeem you. But if he doesn’t want to redeem you, as the Lord lives, I will. Now lie down until morning.”

14 So she lay down at his feet until morning but got up while it was still dark. Then Boaz said, “Don’t let it be known that a woman came to the threshing floor.” 15 And he told Ruth, “Bring the shawl you’re wearing and hold it out.” When she held it out, he shoveled six measures of barley into her shawl, and she went into the town.

The section is divided into two parts.

  • Verses 6-13 occurs at the threshing floor, likely between evening and midnight.
  • Verses 14-15 occur between midnight and morning and ends with Ruth returning to town with the grain.

The first subsection, verses 6-13, contains four points.

  • Ruth takes charge of the situation after Boaz wakes up and asks her who she is. This is remarkable for several reasons.
    • Ruth just described herself as a slave, and Boaz is her master.
    • Ruth is uninvited and on his turf.
    • Ruth is a woman, and Boaz is a man.
    • Ruth is a foreigner, and he is a native.
  • Because of the flipping of the roles, it begs the question, “Who is Boaz?”
  • With no warning, Ruth asks Boaz to marry her.
    • The Hebrew phrase that is translated as “Spread your cloak over me” actually means “to spread one’s wings over” and is a metaphor for the protection and provision that Yahweh provides.
      • Ruth is demanding that Boaz takes her under his wings and assume responsibility for her.
      • In Hebrew, the term “to spread one’s wings over someone” was a way to propose marriage.
      • It signified the husband’s declaration to provide for his future wife.
    • Boaz correctly interprets Ruth’s actions not as a request for sex but as a marriage proposal.
  • The basis for the proposal is that Boaz is the kinsman-redeemer for Naomi and Ruth.
    • Ruth fully understands this Israelite custom, likely from discussions with Naomi.
    • Ruth, although a Moabite, is aware and accepts the custom.

Boaz’s response is also remarkable. His response breaks down into four parts.

  • A blessing and eulogy for Ruth.
    • Asking Yahweh to bless her.
    • Acknowledgment of kindness towards Boaz.
    • Acknowledging that although Ruth could have pursued younger men, she didn’t.
  • A promise.
    • Remove any fear.
    • Boaz will pursue the marriage Ruth proposed.
    • The townspeople already recognize her noble character and would welcome the marriage.
  • A disclosure of a complication.
    • Boaz is a kinsman-redeemer.
    • However, there is a kinsman-redeemer with a closer blood tie than Boaz. That man, unnamed, will have to be given the first chance before Boaz can fulfill the promise.
  • Words of reassurance.
    • Boaz tells Ruth to rest as they can do nothing more about the situation until the morning when the issue of redemption can be brought up before the town and the man first in line to redeem Elimelech’s inheritance.
    • Boaz’s determination is expressed in the phrase “as the LORD lives,” which is an oath to make it happen.

Before moving on to the next section of the passage, let’s consider the nature of the marriage that Naomi and Ruth likely discussed and which Boaz agreed to enter.

  • So far, there has been no discussion of children.
    • The family preservation idea present in Deuteronomy 25:5-10 has not been a part of the discussion.
    • The primary reason for the marriage was not preserving Mahlon’s family name. It was to provide a secure and stable home for Ruth.
  • There are no specific instructions in the Law to cover these circumstances. Naomi’s idea is based solely on confidence that Boaz will do the right thing out of a sense of moral obligation to the family.

Boaz now senses the delicate nature of their circumstances as the sun begins to rise. Not only does Boaz need to protect Ruth’s reputation, but Boaz also has a reputation to protect as well.

  • If the workers discovered Ruth with Boaz, it would undermine his reputation and maybe his ability to effectively interact with them in the future.
  • Before allowing Ruth to leave, Boaz gives her additional grain to take back home.

Verses 16-18

16 She went to her mother-in-law, Naomi, who asked her, “How did it go, my daughter?”

Then Ruth told her everything the man had done for her. 17 She said, “He gave me these six measures of barley, because he said, ‘Don’t go back to your mother-in-law empty-handed.’ ”

18 Naomi said, “My daughter, wait until you find out how things go, for he won’t rest unless he resolves this today.”

One can imagine that, just as Ruth and Boaz likely had a restless night, that Naomi was in the same state as she waited for Ruth to come home. Once Ruth makes it home, Naomi wants to know what happened and if her plan to join the two in marriage was a success.

The conversation then quickly shifts to the grain that Ruth brought home. In the previous section, the reader can only speculate about the reason for the gift of grain. In this section, more information is given as to the reason, and we can draw some conclusions as to why Boaz gave the grain.

  • It is possible that Boaz’s interpretation of the kinsman-redeemer principle means that he views Naomi as the true beneficiary, and his obligation is to Naomi rather than Ruth.
  • The grain could be viewed as a gift for the plan that Naomi devised.
    • Naomi encouraged Ruth to end her mourning and put on normal clothes.
    • Naomi devised the plan on how Ruth was to meet Boaz.
    • Naomi advised Ruth to present the issue of Boaz being their kinsman-redeemer.
    • Naomi was the brain behind the entire plan, and the grain is a gift in recognition of her plan.
  • It could’ve been a gift to Naomi as an indication of Boaz’s promise to redeem Ruth. Either directly or through the man who had the first chance to redeem her. In addition, since Naomi was Ruth’s legal guardian, Boaz may have intended the grain as a down payment on the bride dowry given at the time of engagement.

Naomi’s response in verse 18 indicates it is the third possibility that is the correct interpretation.

Chapter 3 continues the illustration that Boaz is a typology of Christ.

  • Redemption through a kinsman-redeemer.
    • Ruth asked Boaz to redeem her.
    • Each of us can come humbly before Jesus and ask Him for redemption from the consequences of sin, eternal condemnation, and separation from God in hell.
  • Protection.
    • Ruth sought the protection of a husband and a loving home.
    • We should daily ask for protection. This is a humble act acknowledging our reliance on God.
      • We need protection from the desires of our sinful nature.
      • From the pressures of the world.
      • From the devil, who prowls like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.
  • Responsibility.
    • Boaz accepted the responsibility to act as the kinsman-redeemer.
    • Jesus accepted the responsibility of going to the cross, demonstrating obedience to God’s plan, and accepting the responsibility of all of our sins to set us free from the condemnation we deserved.

Applications

  • Do we accept responsibility for what’s right when opportunities present themselves to us?
  • Do we act with a noble character when temptation presents itself? While Ruth was not tempting Boaz in a sexual manner, if Boaz had interpreted it that way, the situation would have had a radically different ending.
  • As we interact with our spiritual brothers and sisters, do we accept the biblical responsibility to encourage and care for each other, serve one another, sympathize with their hurts or struggles, speak the truth in love, teach and correct one another?
  • As we interact with non-Christians, do we accept the biblical responsibility to live before them in a way that shines the light of Jesus, makes the Gospel attractive to them, and share the Gospel with them?

Ruth Lesson Five

Blessings Return – Ruth 2:17-23

17 So Ruth gathered grain in the field until evening. She beat out what she had gathered, and it was about 26 quarts of barley. 18 She picked up the grain and went into the town, where her mother-in-law saw what she had gleaned. Then she brought out what she had left over from her meal and gave it to her.

19 Then her mother-in-law said to her, “Where did you gather barley today, and where did you work? May the Lord bless the man who noticed you.”

Ruth told her mother-in-law about the men she had worked with and said, “The name of the man I worked with today is Boaz.”

20 Then Naomi said to her daughter-in-law, “May he be blessed by the Lord, who has not forsaken his kindness to the living or the dead.” Naomi continued, “The man is a close relative. He is one of our family redeemers.”

21 Ruth the Moabitess said, “He also told me, ‘Stay with my young men until they have finished all of my harvest.’ ”

22 So Naomi said to her daughter-in-law Ruth, “My daughter, it is good for you to work  with his female servants, so that nothing will happen to you in another field.” 23 Ruth stayed close to Boaz’s female servants and gathered grain until the barley and the wheat harvests were finished. And she lived with her mother-in-law. (HCSB)

In this lesson, we see Ruth continuing to pick the grain and take it home to Naomi. Ruth then tells the events of the day, how she met Boaz, and the instructions that Boaz gave to her and his servants. Although most of the passage occurs on the same day, the last verse indicates that anywhere from six to ten weeks have elapsed between verses 22 and 23.

Verses 17-18

These two verses seem relatively straightforward, but a closer look reveals some startling details.

  • Ruth was obviously very industrious. She has worked the entire day, except for the mid-day meal in the last section.
  • Separating the grain from the stalks is no easy task. It requires some type of stick to beat the heads of the barley to remove the grain.
  • The amount of grain gathered was 26 quarts or about one ephah. That is an incredible amount of grain for one person to harvest in just one day. Estimates range between 30 and 50 pounds of barley.
  • Not only did Ruth harvest that much grain, but she also transported it back to Naomi’s house. We don’t know for sure, but it is probably safe to say, due to Ruth’s circumstances (Moabite and widow), that she had to carry it herself. Even if it was a short distance, not likely, that is quite an accomplishment for one woman.
  • Ruth shares the leftovers from her noon-day meal with Naomi.

Comparing the circumstances that the two women found themselves in while in Moab to the results of just one day of gathering grain, the reader sees a remarkable change of fortune. They left Moab with nothing but what they wore and maybe a few possessions, and now they have an overflowing abundance of grain. The once bitter Naomi is now overflowing with joy and optimism. This demonstrates a couple of characteristics of Yahweh.

  • If we repent and turn back, His anger lasts for only a moment.
  • His love and favor are never-ending.
  • Genesis 24:27  and said, “Praise the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who has not withheld His kindness and faithfulness from my master. As for me, the LORD has led me on the journey to the house of my master’s relatives.”

Verses 19-22

19 Then her mother-in-law said to her, “Where did you gather barley today, and where did you work? May the Lord bless the man who noticed you.”

Ruth told her mother-in-law about the men she had worked with and said, “The name of the man I worked with today is Boaz.”

20 Then Naomi said to her daughter-in-law, “May he be blessed by the Lord, who has not forsaken his kindness to the living or the dead.” Naomi continued, “The man is a close relative. He is one of our family redeemers.”

21 Ruth the Moabitess said, “He also told me, ‘Stay with my young men until they have finished all of my harvest.’ ”

22 So Naomi said to her daughter-in-law Ruth, “My daughter, it is good for you to work  with his female servants, so that nothing will happen to you in another field.”

Although we can’t read the “tone” of Naomi’s statement when Ruth comes home, we can certainly infer that she was at least mildly surprised by the amount of grain she harvested. Before even knowing who it was, Naomi is asking Yahweh to bless the man who showed such kindness and allowed Ruth to not only work but to bring a bountiful harvest home. When Naomi hears the name of Boaz, she proclaims a second blessing and tells Ruth that Boaz is a blood relative, and more importantly, a kinsman-redeemer. The relationship of Boaz to Naomi is a critical point as events unfold. Let’s review a couple of passages that talk about the kinsman-redeemer.

  • Leviticus 25:25  If your brother becomes destitute and sells part of his property, his nearest relative may come and redeem what his brother has sold.
  • Leviticus 25:47-49  47 “If a foreigner or temporary resident living among you prospers, but your brother living near him becomes destitute and sells himself to the foreigner living among you, or to a member of the foreigner’s clan, 48 he has the right of redemption after he has been sold. One of his brothers may redeem him. 49 His uncle or cousin may redeem him, or any of his close relatives from his clan may redeem him. If he prospers, he may redeem himself.
  • A kinsman-redeemer had four roles according to Scripture.
    • To avenge the murder or rape of a relative. Numbers 35:9-11 The Lord said to Moses, 10 “Speak to the Israelites and tell them: When you cross the Jordan into the land of Canaan, 11 designate cities to serve as cities of refuge for you, so that a person who kills someone unintentionally may flee there.
    • To recover property forfeited by a kinsman. Leviticus 25:25  If your brother becomes destitute and sells part of his property, his nearest relative may come and redeem what his brother has sold.
    • To raise a male heir to his brother who died childless, known as Levirate marriage. Deuteronomy 25:5-10 “When brothers live on the same property  and one of them dies without a son, the wife of the dead man may not marry a stranger outside the family. Her brother-in-law is to take her as his wife, have sexual relations with her, and perform the duty of a brother-in-law for her. The first son she bears will carry on the name of the dead brother, so his name will not be blotted out from Israel.  But if the man doesn’t want to marry his sister-in-law, she must go to the elders at the city gate and say, ‘My brother-in-law refuses to preserve his brother’s name in Israel. He isn’t willing to perform the duty of a brother-in-law for me.’ The elders of his city will summon him and speak with him. If he persists and says, ‘I don’t want to marry her,’ then his sister-in-law will go up to him in the sight of the elders, remove his sandal from his foot, and spit in his face. Then she will declare, ‘This is what is done to a man who will not build up his brother’s house.’ 10 And his family name in Israel will be called ‘The house of the man whose sandal was removed.’
    • To support a fellow kinsman and/or their dependents or redeem them from debt. Leviticus 25:35-55 35 “If your brother becomes destitute and cannot sustain himself among you, you are to support him as a foreigner or temporary resident, so that he can continue to live among you. 36 Do not profit or take interest from him, but fear your God and let your brother live among you. 37 You are not to lend him your silver with interest or sell him your food for profit. 38 I am Yahweh your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt to give you the land of Canaan and to be your God. 39 “If your brother among you becomes destitute and sells himself to you, you must not force him to do slave labor. 40 Let him stay with you as a hired hand or temporary resident; he may work for you until the Year of Jubilee. 41 Then he and his children are to be released from you, and he may return to his clan and his ancestral property. 42 They are not to be sold as slaves, because they are My slaves that I brought out of the land of Egypt. 43 You are not to rule over them harshly but fear your God. 44 Your male and female slaves are to be from the nations around you; you may purchase male and female slaves. 45 You may also purchase them from the foreigners staying with you, or from their families living among you—those born in your land. These may become your property. 46 You may leave them to your sons after you to inherit as property; you can make them slaves for life. But concerning your brothers, the Israelites, you must not rule over one another harshly. 47 “If a foreigner or temporary resident living among you prospers, but your brother living near him becomes destitute and sells himself to the foreigner living among you, or to a member of the foreigner’s clan, 48 he has the right of redemption after he has been sold. One of his brothers may redeem him. 49 His uncle or cousin may redeem him, or any of his close relatives from his clan may redeem him. If he prospers, he may redeem himself. 50 The one who purchased him is to calculate the time from the year he sold himself to him until the Year of Jubilee. The price of his sale will be determined by the number of years. It will be set for him like the daily wages of a hired hand. 51 If many years are still left, he must pay his redemption price in proportion to them based on his purchase price. 52 If only a few years remain until the Year of Jubilee, he will calculate and pay the price of his redemption in proportion to his remaining years. 53 He will stay with him like a man hired year by year. A foreign owner is not to rule over him harshly in your sight. 54 If he is not redeemed in any of these ways, he and his children are to be released at the Year of Jubilee. 55 For the Israelites are My slaves. They are My slaves that I brought out of the land of Egypt; I am Yahweh your God.

Ruth tells Naomi how Boaz told her to stay with his workers until they have finished all of the harvests. Boaz isn’t inviting Ruth to glean for a day or two; he tells her to continue to come until the harvest is complete.

Naomi not only approves of the offer but further explains why this is beneficial to Ruth. Boaz has female workers who participate in the harvesting. Not only did Boaz tell the male workers to leave Ruth alone, but there are also other females in the work crew, creating a safer overall environment.

Verse 23

Ruth stayed close to Boaz’s female servants and gathered grain until the barley and the wheat harvests were finished. And she lived with her mother-in-law.

There are two explicit things happening here, and one that is not readily apparent.

  • Ruth is still committed to Naomi, as seen in the last sentence.
    • Ruth made an oath to Naomi, and she is sticking to it.
    • The two women are sharing in the favor of the Lord after returning to Bethlehem, the house of bread.
  • The passage specifies two harvests.
    • Barley harvest.
      • Barley was the second most important grain.
      • It was the primary grain for the lower socio-economic class.
      • The barley harvest typically began in March or April.
      • Barley was used to assess the value of the land. Leviticus 27:16 If a man consecrates to the Lord any part of a field that he possesses, your assessment of value will be proportional to the seed needed to sow it, at the rate of 50 silver shekels for every five bushels of barley seed.
      • It coincided with Passover.
    • Wheat harvest.
      • Wheat was the most important grain.
      • The wheat harvest was typically complete around the beginning of June.
      • It culminated with the feast at Pentecost, also called the Festival of Weeks, which would begin seven weeks or 50 days after Passover.
      • Deuteronomy 16:9  “You are to count seven weeks, counting the weeks from the time the sickle is first put to the standing grain.
      • Exodus 34:22 “Observe the Festival of Weeks with the firstfruits of the wheat harvest, and the Festival of Ingathering at the turn of the agricultural year.
  • Ruth gathered grain for an extended period of time.
    • An understanding of the agricultural cycle of the region and time indicates that Ruth was able to gather grain, both barley and wheat, for approximately two months.
    • During this time, even if Ruth doesn’t continue at the same gleaning pace as on the first day, it is safe to infer that over the course of the harvest, she was able to bring an overflowing abundance to Naomi’s house to provide for their needs.

Let’s make some summary observations from this passage.

  • The Lord’s favor does not mean we will have a trouble-free life.
  • Ruth was not only a hard worker; she didn’t waste anything God had provided to her.
  • The change in Naomi occurred because of the hope she had in Boaz as a kinsman-redeemer.

Applications

  • Hard work pays off. This isn’t an endorsement of works-based salvation. However, it is an endorsement of doing our best at whatever we do. Colossians 3:23  Whatever you do, do it enthusiastically, as something done for the Lord and not for men.
  • Do you practice stewardship with your resources? Ruth didn’t waste any of her mid-day meal that Boaz provided. She brought what was leftover and shared it with Naomi. How often do we see others, or maybe even ourselves, take more food than we eat and then throw the extra away? This concept doesn’t apply to just food. Do we “need” a big house just because, or could we make do with a smaller place.
  • Just as Naomi and Ruth had a kinsmen-redeemer, Boaz, to rescue them, we also have a Redeemer. No matter what our circumstances or difficulties are, we can rejoice and take comfort in the fact that Jesus is our Redeemer. When we have surrendered to His lordship, we have no more worries or fears, regardless of the difficulties that we are going through.